5kits zhao

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

Simone Hoermann, Ph.D. Updated: Jul 8th 2010

On several occasions, I have written about the difficulties in  self-regulation that are commonly experienced by people with Personality Disorders. Related to that, people with Personality Disorders also tend to have difficulties in interpersonal relationships.  Take, for example, someone with Avoidant Personality Disorder who only has very few relationships, or someone with Borderline Personality Disorder who is extremely afraid of abandonment. Many experts believe that these difficulties are in some way related to experiences in early childhood relationships.  While we don’t know how exactly Personality Disorders develop and what causes them, there is some indication that it is probably a combination of biological makeup and disposition in interaction with life experiences and the environment that are at the root of these difficulties.

One lens through which to look at this is Attachment Theory, first postulated by John Bowlby in the late 1960s. Bowlby suggested that we all are born with a biologically determined need to form close relationships. According to Bowlby, the human infant has the inborn need to seek proximity to a caregiver in moments of fear and distress. In other words, when the child feels that there is some form of threat or distress, its attachment behaviors get activated. You are probably familiar with some of these behaviors: Clinging, crying, smiling, or proximity seeking. In turn, the caregiver tends to respond through soothing and protective behaviors.

Read in Full:  http://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=38648&cn=8



Leave a Reply

*