5kits zhao

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

August 3, 2010

The way the brain reacts differently to the sense of touch in people with Autism will be examined as part of an innovative Cardiff University study designed to create better understanding of the condition.

Dr David McGonigle from Cardiff University’s Schools of Psychology and Biosciences will use the latest brain imaging techniques to create a clearer picture of how touch is processed differently.

Sensory dysfunction is known to affect the quality of life of people with . Certain qualities of touch, sound or movement are known to be distracting and unpleasant in some sufferers, while others may not even notice a particular sound or colour, which can make everyday activities difficult.

Dr McGonigle, who leads the two-year study, said: “It’s common for work on (ASD) to focus on the communicative or social aspects of the disorder.

“However, there are also high incidences of sensory symptoms in people with ASD. With an estimated 80 percent of those diagnosed suffering from some aspect of sensory dysfunction this is something that we need to understand better to provide a fuller picture of the disorder.”

The study will, for the first time, combine traditional experimental tests of touch, such as the ability to feel and distinguish between different sorts of vibrations delivered to the fingers, with images of the brain from the latest state-of-the-art neuroimaging equipment.

Read in Full:  http://www.physorg.com/news200060724.html



Leave a Reply

*