jintropin

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Recent Posts

Blogroll






 

Article Date: 15 Oct 2010 – 0:00 PDT

If you want to have good mental health, it’s not enough to just have a job, you should also have a job that satisfies you, according to new research from The Australian National University.

The research, led by Dr Liana Leach of the Centre for Mental Health Research at ANU, found that employment isn’t always linked to better mental health. In fact, people who moved from unemployment into poor quality jobs were much more likely to be depressed than those who were still unemployed. The researchers’ work is published in this month’s BMC Public Health and is released as part of Mental Health Week.

“Our work found that people in poor quality jobs – jobs which were insecure, did not provide future job prospects or had high levels of strain – had no better mental health than people who were unemployed,” said Dr Leach.

“In fact, the research showed that people who moved from being unemployed into poor quality jobs were significantly more likely to be depressed at follow-up than those people who remained unemployed.”

Research generally shows that people who are employed have better mental health than those who are unemployed. The findings from this research indicate that things may not be that simple and that employers may need to be more aware of the roles they ask staff to perform

Read in Full:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/204410.php

 

Brain Imaging Reveals How We Learn From Our Competitors

Article Date: 15 Oct 2010 – 0:00 PDT

Learning from competitors is a critically important form of learning for animals and humans. A new study has used brain imaging to reveal how people and animals learn from failure and success.

The team from Bristol University led by Dr Paul Howard-Jones, Senior Lecturer in Education in the Graduate School of Education and Dr Rafal Bogacz, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, scanned the brains of players as they battled against an artificial opponent in a computer game.

In the game, each player took turns with the computer to select one of four boxes whose payouts were simulating the ebb and flow of natural food sources.

Players were able to learn from their own successful selections but those of their competitor failed completely to increase their neural activity. Instead, it was their competitor’s unexpected failures that generated this additional brain activity. Such failures generated both reward signals in the brains of the players, and learning signals in regions involved with inhibiting response. This suggests that we benefit from our competitors’ failures by learning to inhibit the actions that lead to them.

Read in Full:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/204582.php



Leave a Reply

*