jintropin

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Recent Posts

Blogroll






 

Sonja Perren email, Julian Dooley email, Therese Shaw email and Donna Cross email

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health 2010, 4:28doi:10.1186/1753-2000-4-28

 
Published: 23 November 2010

Abstract (provisional)

Background

Cyber-bullying (i.e., bullying via electronic means) has emerged as a new form of bullying that presents unique challenges to those victimised. Recent studies have demonstrated that there is a significant conceptual and practical overlap between both types of bullying such that most young people who are cyber-bullied also tend to be bullied by more traditional methods. Despite the overlap between traditional and cyber forms of bullying, it remains unclear if being a victim of cyber-bullying has the same negative consequences as being a victim of traditional bullying.

Method

The current study investigated associations between cyber versus traditional bullying and depressive symptoms in 374 and 1320 students from Switzerland and Australia respectively (52% female; Age: M = 13.8, SD = 1.0). All participants completed a bullying questionnaire (assessing perpetration and victimisation of traditional and cyber forms of bullying behaviour) in addition to scales on depressive symptoms.

Results

Across both samples, traditional victims and bully-victims reported more depressive symptoms than bullies and non-involved children. Importantly, victims of cyber-bullying reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms, even when controlling for the involvement in traditional bullying/victimisation.

Conclusions

Overall, cyber-victimisation emerged as an additional risk factor for depressive symptoms in adolescents involved in bullying.

The complete article is available as a provisional PDF. The fully formatted PDF and HTML versions are in production.

http://www.capmh.com/content/4/1/28



Leave a Reply

*