jintropin

Calendar

January 2015
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Pages

Archives

Recent Posts

Blogroll





Archive for January 3rd, 2015

 

 

Some have an aversion to winter, and can you really blame them? There’s chatter surrounding possible storms or blizzards. There’s loneliness, depression and anxiety that may be coupled with the holiday season. And then there’s the chronic cold that dares people to pack their bags and book a tropical getaway. (Or at least think about making a great escape for warmth.)

 

However, winter can rejuvenate our spirits. Here are several ways this chilly season can boost our mental health:

 

Take a wintry stroll.

 

The cold air reminds us we have no choice but to become aware of what’s around us. We observe our smoky breath from frigid temperatures. We observe the branches that are now bare.

 

At times, the early afternoon sunlight illuminates these desolate trees and emptiness never seems so captivating and lovely. And when the snow gently covers what we see, there’s a feeling of hope. Anything is possible; nothing is too crazy. Interestingly enough, the winter season is when nature appears to be dying. Yet, the cool, crisp air and the scenic landscape give us a feeling of rebirth.

 

Our closets are packed with scarves and hats and leather and wool. More important, our layers of clothing serve as insulation — literal armor for what we’ll face in the months ahead. Moments of fear, insecurity, stress and discomfort are already cushioned, already protected by winter’s foundation.

 

 

Embrace cozy chats.

 

We can curl up by the fireplace or anywhere that’s cozy and immerse ourselves in substantive and meaningful conversations. We’re not going anywhere in that moment. We’re here. We’re breathing. We’re alive.

 

Many shudder at the thought of enduring the winter season. However, taking refreshing and revitalizing wintry strolls, indulging in snowy activities, reveling in indoor fun and embracing cozy chats — dialogues that spark human connection — can be viewed as winter’s more positive aspects.

 

If it’s autumn’s vibrant and ever-changing nature that perks us up after hot summers, where we slowly maneuver our way through the blazing sun, then it’s winter that really smacks us awake. We’re here. We’re breathing. We’re alive.

 

Read in Full:

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2015/01/02/ways-winter-can-boost-our-mental-health/



 

People prone to feeling guilty are amongst the hardest workers, a new study finds.

 

Not only that but people prone to feeling guilty are also highly ethical and are less likely to take advantage of other people’s skills to get paid more.

 

The results come from research published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, in which psychologists carried out 5 studies to test the effects of feeling guilty on work performance (Wiltermuth & Cohen, 2014).

 

Dr. Scott S. Wiltermuth, the study’s first author, said:

“Because of this concern for the impact of their actions on others’ welfare, highly guilt-prone people often outwork their less guilt-prone colleagues, demonstrate more effective leadership and contribute more to the success of the teams and partnerships in which they are involved.”

 

Set against these advantages, though, guilt-prone people may avoid working with others they see as more competent than themselves.

 

Read More …

http://www.spring.org.uk/2014/12/the-emotion-which-drives-people-to-work-the-hardest.php