5kits zhao

Calendar

December 2014
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






In the play (and movie) "Steel Magnolias," the character, Shelby, sits in a beauty salon chair while others discuss her medical condition. Autistic people often report this same type of treatment from those around them.

 

In the play (and movie) “Steel Magnolias,” the character, Shelby, sits in a beauty salon chair while others discuss her medical condition. Autistic people often report this same type of treatment from those around them.
Photo by Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

 

 

 

December 1, 2014

 

In the movie, Steel Magnolias, Shelby, following a reaction to an excess of insulin, struggles to blurt out the sentence, “Don’t talk about me like I’m not here!”

 

Autism Speaks controversial video, “Autism Every Day” features a scene where a mother briefly discusses committing suicide in her car with her autistic daughter. The girl is seen playing in the background as she says this.

 

It would seem impolite to talk about someone when they are standing within earshot, yet autistics experience this behavior on a regular basis.

 

In today’s world, a quick assessment of a person’s intelligence is often made on the basis of social skills.

 

Failure to respond in a “typical” way is equated with a failure to understand.

 

Autistics at every level of the spectrum can understand. Some with exceptionally high I.Q.s may understand a situation better than the person who is speaking to them.

 

They, simply, do not know how to respond.

 

A condition such as selective mutism, or apraxia of speech might be behind this failure to respond. A person with Asperger’s syndrome might be able to respond, but is reluctant to do so due to past social failures.

 

Non-verbal autistics who communicate with keyboards will report understanding what was being said around them, including being called “damaged” or a “burden.”

 

Many in the autistic community would call this a form of discrimination.

 

Read in Full:

http://www.examiner.com/article/autistic-person-the-room?cid=rss



Leave a Reply

*