5kits zhao

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

Tight Pockets, Tight Fists – Downturn In Profits, Upturn In Bullying – British Psychological Society

Article Date: 14 Jan 2010 – 3:00 PST

Impact Consulting Business Psychologists will host a professional forum on how organisations can manage workplace bullying on 14th January 2010 at the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology Annual Conference.

Prior to the recession, costs of workplace bullying to society were estimated at £13.75 billion in 2007. Current economic pressures are creating previously unseen levels of anxiety within organisations, resulting in highly stressful working environments and encouraging increased negative behaviour. In turn, this invites excessive managerial control, risking the creation of a downward spiral of negativity within the workplace.

Impact Consulting Business Psychologists conduct research into the effectiveness of interventions and support client organisations with best practice approaches. They will be hosting a professional forum on how organisations can manage the problem through using Occupational Psychology.

The event will be used to discuss how organisations can tackle the climate of fear and address the issue of destructive, costly and negative behaviour head on. Strategies to reverse the ‘downward spiral’ of stress and negative behaviour are paramount to create a positive environment for developing sustainable approaches to performance management.

Shelly Rubinstein, Chartered Occupational Psychologist and Managing Director of Impact Consulting said: “Over the past year we have been working increasingly on issues of negative behaviour in the workplace, often resulting from recessionary impacts and associated stress. Our unique position has allowed us to integrate theory with practice in devising a strategy in handling the problem.”

Source
British Psychological Society  

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/175985.php

One In Four Girls Aged 12-17 Were Involved In Serious Fights Or Attacks In The Past Year

Article Date: 14 Jan 2010 – 2:00 PST

A report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) indicates that, in the past year, one quarter (26.7 percent) of adolescent girls participated in a serious fight at school or work, group-against-group fight, or an attack on others with the intent to inflict serious harm.

“These findings are alarming,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde, J.D. “We need to do a better job reaching girls at risk and teaching them how to resolve problems without resorting to violence.”

When combined, 2006 to 2008 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) shows that 18.6 percent of adolescent females got into a serious fight at school or work in the past year, 14.1 percent participated in a group-against-group fight, and 5.7 percent attacked others with the intent to seriously hurt them; one quarter (26.7 percent) of adolescent females engaged in at least one of these violent behaviors in the past year. Other key findings from the NSDUH survey include:

– The prevalence of these violent acts in the past year decreased as annual family income increased. The violent behaviors were reported by 36.5 percent of adolescent females who lived in families with annual incomes of less than $20,000, 30.5 percent of those in families with annual incomes of $20,000-$49,999, 22.8 percent with annual incomes of $50,000 to $74,999, and 20.7 percent with annual incomes of $75,000 or more.

– In the past year, adolescent females who engaged in any of these violent behaviors were more likely than those who did not to have indicated past month binge alcohol use (15.1 vs. 6.9 percent), marijuana use (11.4 vs. 4.1 percent), and use of illicit drugs other than marijuana (9.2 vs. 3.2 percent).

– Adolescent females who were not currently enrolled or attending school were more likely than those who were in school to have engaged in one of these violent behaviors in the past year (34.3 vs. 26.7 percent). Among those who attended school in the past year, rates of violent behaviors increased as academic grades decreased.

Despite media attention on high-profile accounts of females’ acts of violence, rates of these violent behaviors among adolescent females remained stable according to the NSDUH report when comparing combined data from 2002-2004 and 2006-2008.

Violent Behaviors among Adolescent Females is based on the responses of 33,091 female youths aged 12 to 17 participating in the 2006, 2007, and 2008 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The full report is available online here.

Source
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA)  

Source:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/175962.php



Leave a Reply

*