5kits zhao

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 Male Nurse

By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on December 8, 2010

While gender expectations in the workplace have shifted substantially in recent decades — with more women as CEOs, more men as nurses — gender neutrality on the job is far from a fait accompli

A new study examines perceptions of people in high-powered jobs and finds that they’re likely to be judged more harshly for mistakes if they’re in a job that’s not normally associated with their gender.

“The reason I got interested is, there was so much talk about race and gender barriers being broken,” says Victoria Brescoll, psychologist at Yale University and first author of the study.

In the 2008 presidential election, a woman came close to getting a nomination, and an African-American man ended up president of the United States—a job formerly reserved for white men.

But just getting a job with high status isn’t enough, Brescoll says; you have to keep it. She suspected that people who have a job not normally associated with their gender would be under closer scrutiny and more likely to get in trouble for mistakes.

“Any mistakes that they make, even very minor ones, could be magnified and seen as even greater mistakes,” she says.

Brescoll and her colleagues, Erica Dawson and Eric Luis Uhlmann, came up with a list of high-status jobs that are normally held by one gender or the other. This was easy for men, but actually quite difficult for women; the one they came up with was the president of a woman’s college.

For this study, they compared that to a police chief, a traditionally male role. They pre-tested the jobs to make sure people perceived them as having similar status and also being associated with one gender or the other.

Read in Full:  http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/12/08/performance-expectations-subject-to-gender-bias/21625.html



Leave a Reply

*