jintropin

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Recent Posts

Blogroll






 

By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on October 6, 2010 

A new study leads scientists to believe the urge to do exciting things is linked to the neurotransmitter dopamine, a chemical that helps transmit messages in your brain.

Researchers analyzed genes in the dopamine system and found a group of mutations that help predict whether someone is inclined toward sensation seeking.

Sensation seeking has been linked to a range of behavior disorders, such as drug addiction. It isn’t all bad, though.

“Not everyone who’s high on sensation seeking becomes a drug addict. They may become an Army Ranger or an artist. It’s all in how you channel it,” says Jaime Derringer, the first author of the study.

She wanted to use a new technique to find out more about the genetics of sensation seeking. Most obvious connections with genes, like the BRCA gene that increases the risk for breast cancer, have already been found, Derringer says.

Now new methods are letting scientists look for more subtle associations between genes and all kinds of traits, including behavior and personality.

Read in Full:  http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/06/is-thrill-seeking-hard-wired/19245.html



Leave a Reply

*