buy hypertropin

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on November 1, 2010 

A new field of study is ecopsychology, or the relationship between environmental issues and mental health and well-being.

A new journal issue explores the premise that women experience and interact with their natural surroundings in ways that differ from men.

The way in which those differences affect a woman’s sense of self, body image, and drive to protect and preserve the environment are explored in a special issue of the journal Ecopsychology.

Guest editors Britain Scott, PhD and Lisa Lynch, PhD, present a collection of articles that encompass observations and theories on how female gender, motherhood, human nature, and gender-based societal norms influence a woman’s self-perception and behavior.

Topics focus on what women may gain from interacting with their surroundings on a sensory level and how they may benefit from nature-based therapies.

In the article “Babes and the Woods: Women’s Objectification and the Feminine Beauty Ideal as Ecological Hazards,” Dr. Scott explains how cultural norms that promote a view of women as sex objects have led women to become preoccupied with, and generally critical of, their bodies.

This feeling among women that they fall short of the feminine beauty ideal has a negative impact on their attitude toward, and ability to connect with, the environment.

Kari Hennigan, PhD, suggests that women who spend time in natural settings and interact with the environment are more likely to have a better body image and to distance themselves from societal definitions of beauty.

Read in Full:  http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/11/01/do-women-have-a-special-connection-to-nature/20396.html



Leave a Reply

*