5kits zhao

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

“Overcoming Tourette syndrome and having a child with asperger’s syndrome, Ms. DeWet wanted to channel her experience, knowledge and passions into something new, which resulted in the recent opening of the Assist Autism Foundation …”

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Founder Of Assist Autism Foundation, Author Works To Help Those In Need

Cindi DeWet channels her free-spirited nature into everything she does, from raising children and promoting wellness to writing books and launching the Assist Autism Foundation.

Ms. DeWet chronicles what she calls a “tragic childhood” in a recently released book, “A Juicy Joyful Life,” which quickly has become a bestseller.

She grew up a desert girl, one of four siblings. Her father owned a construction company, while her mother was a homemaker. Her father’s company built the La Paloma resort in Tuscon, Ariz.

“I kind of have a little Native American in me and a little Irish in me, but I have a Native American spirit,” Ms. DeWet said. “I’m into herbs and oils and all-natural living.”

A broken home led to her mother moving the children from Tuscon to a less-than-free-spirited Athens in East Texas, where relatives lived, when Ms. DeWet was 15.

“It was absolutely culture shock,” she said. “I had never known anything about the southern ways, I guess. It was totally different.

“I loved the greenery, though. It’s very beautiful in East Texas.”
 
 
 She attended Central Baptist School, where she wrote for the school newspaper. She also was a gymnast and dancer. Wanting to graduate from high school early, she took on extra class work.
“I needed to get done and get on with life,” she said. “I had things to do.”

But school officials did not believe she could finish early and prohibited her from purchasing a class ring and cap and gown, she said, adding that they also would not let her attend senior dances.

“They thought I probably wouldn’t graduate,” Ms. DeWet said. “On graduation day, I borrowed someone else’s cap and gown and walked down the aisle and got my diploma.”

She was barely 17 years old when she graduated from high school in 1988. From there, she went to work as an assistant for a chiropractor. Wanting to become an osteopath, she started nursing school.

Read in Full:  http://www.tylerpaper.com/article/20101010/BUSINESS0504/10100306

 



Leave a Reply

*