jintropin for sale

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

Beginning with the upcoming fifth edition, new versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) will be identified with Arabic rather than Roman numerals, marking a change in how future updates will be created, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

The new edition will be identified as DSM-5, breaking the pattern established with publication of the DSM-II in 1968. The change reflects the ability of the APA to use new technologies to create a document that can respond more quickly when a preponderance of research supports a change.

“While knowledge about mental illnesses has grown significantly in the last half century, knowledge of neurobiology will continue to advance,” said APA President Alan F. Schatzberg, M.D. “Some of the changes coming with DSM-5 will facilitate new approaches to research that will lead to further advances.”

Following the publication of the DSM-5, ongoing review groups will be established to coordinate and oversee periodic assessments of advancements. The review groups will determine if a more intensive assessment or changes to the diagnostic criteria are warranted. APA practice guidelines and other diagnostic manuals are updated following a similar process.

“Advances in research will continue to drive changes to the DSM,” said David Kupfer, M.D., chair of the DSM-5 Task Force, which is in charge of the current revision process. “Our primary commitment will continue to be to create a manual that is based on science and is useful in diagnosing and treating patients.”

Incremental updates will be identified with decimals, i.e. DSM-5.1, DSM-5.2, etc., until a new edition is required.

“The research base is evolving at different rates for different disorders,” said Darrel Regier, M.D., M.P.H., vice chair of the DSM Task Force and executive director of the American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education. “By making the DSM-5 a living document, we will ensure that the DSM will remain a common language in the field. It will hasten our response to breakthroughs in research.” The anticipated bibliographic citation to the book is American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 2013. Draft criteria for DSM-5 are available for review and comment until April 20 at http://www.dsm5.org.

Source
American Psychiatric Association
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/181714.php
 



Leave a Reply

*