buy hypertropin

Calendar

January 2011
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Pages

Archives

Blogroll






 

Jared D. Michonski email and Carla Sharp email

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health 2010, 4:24doi:10.1186/1753-2000-4-24

 
Published: 3 September 2010

Abstract (provisional)

Background

In his developmental model of emerging psychopathy, Lynam proposed that the “fledgling psychopath” is most likely to be located within a subgroup of children elevated in both hyperactivity/inattention/impulsivity (HIA) and conduct problems (CP). This approach has garnered some empirical support. However, the extent to which Lynam’s model captures children who resemble psychopathy with regard to the core affective and interpersonal features remains unclear. Methods. In the present study, we investigated this issue within a large community sample of youth (N = 617). Four groups (non-HIA-CP, HIA-only, CP-only, and HIA-CP), defined on the basis of teacher reports of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), were compared with respect to parent-reported psychopathic-like traits and subjective emotional reactivity in response to unpleasant, emotionally-laden pictures from the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). Results. Results did not support Lynam’s model. HIA-CP children did not appear most psychopathic-like on dimensions of callous-unemotional and narcissistic personality, nor did they report reduced emotional reactivity to the IAPS relative to the other children. Post-hoc regression analyses revealed a significant moderation such that elevated HIA weakened the association between CP and emotional underarousal. Conclusions. Implications of these findings with regard to the development of psychopathy are discussed.

The complete article is available as a provisional PDF. The fully formatted PDF and HTML versions are in production.

Source:  http://www.capmh.com/content/4/1/24

 

 



Leave a Reply

*